October 2007

FROM THE EDITOR
Dear Katoomba Members,

Greetings and welcome to the tenth edition of the East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group e-newsletter.  

Our newsletter aims to keep our readers aware of the latest news and events relating to payments for ecosystem services (PES) around the world.

We welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions, including any articles that you may wish to share with our readers. Please send them by e-mail to aruhweza@forest-trends.org

Yours sincerely

Alice Ruhweza
Coordinator, East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. ESA KATOOMBA NEWS

2. NEW PES-RELATED INFORMATION FROM VARIOUS COUNTRIES IN THE REGION

3. PES NEWS FROM ACROSS THE OCEAN

4. OTHER RELATED NEWS

5. UPCOMING EVENTS

6.  NEW PUBLICATIONS, RESOURCES & TOOLS

ESA KATOOMBA NEWS

THE EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA KATOOMBA GROUP JOINS UGANDA CARBON BUREAU TO BRIEF COMPANIES IN UGANDA ABOUT OPORTUNITIES IN THE CARBON MARKET

The East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group and the Uganda Carbon Bureau have been briefing businesses in Uganda about opportunities in the carbon market. Briefings have been held with banks, telecom companies and oil exploration companies. The goal has been to develop awareness amongst Ugandan businesses about the carbon market and how they can get involved in the event that they want to become carbon neutral as part of their corporate social responsibility activities. The briefs provided to businesses include the latest information about the carbon market, opportunities that exist in reducing carbon footprints, the scope for brand enhancement, and the value of their potential sources of carbon offset credits.

In Uganda there are major opportunities in raising corporate social responsibility visibility by being early adopters of a carbon neutral strategy. The Uganda Carbon Bureau aims at helping individuals, companies and institutions to understand how carbon trading and climate change will affect their activities. The Uganda Carbon Bureau’s activities focus on both sides of the carbon market – helping create a supply of good quality carbon credits from local projects and matching these to the needs of domestic buyers.

The partnership with the Katoomba Group gives the Uganda Carbon Bureau access to the latest information and years of expertise.

For more information on this partnership please contact Bill Farmer – mail@ugandacarbon.org and Alice Ruhweza – aruhweza@forest-trends.org

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NEW PES-RELATED INFORMATION FROM COUNTRIES IN THE REGION

COMMUNITY BASED FOREST MANAGEMENT AND CARBON PAYMENTS: REAL POSSIBILITIES FOR POVERTY REDUCTION IN TANZANIA?
By Eliakimu Zahabu, Sokoine University of Agriculture and George Jambiya, University of Dar es Salaam
Source: The ARC Journal (2007); Issue 21; Pg 25-27

Recent case studies in Tanzania showed that community-based forest management (CBFM) halts forestation and forest degradation while also sequestering carbon and conserving biodiversity, protecting watershed, and conserving soil and water. Until recently, little was known about carbon sequestration in community-managed forests in Tanzania.

By way of background, CBFM involves management of village forest lands or so-called village forest reserves. In most cases it is designed to transform unsustainable management of existing natural forests in the villages, to more sustainable management. These forests are managed by village governments through established Village Forests Committees (VFCs). Members of the VFCs are selected with equal representation from each sub-village in each village.

The VFCs are responsible for the day-to-day forest management activities such as patrolling, gap planting, and fire fighting in collaboration with other villagers. With assistance from local supporting organizations, they use forest management guidelines and by-laws formulated and approved by the respective district council for use in each village. All these guidelines and bylaws have the same goal of advocating sustainable forest resource use and management. In the process of managing well the forests, carbon is inevitably sequestered.

The carbon sequestration potential of CBFM was assessed as part of the Kyoto: Think Global Act Local research project. (www.communitycarbonforestry.org). A participatory methodology on carbon assessment and monitoring by local communities was developed. The methodology utilises mobile GIS technologies on handheld computers. Experiments were done in different sites to determine: to what extent villages could, after a short training: accurately map the forest area; stratify the forest by ecotype; accurately locate permanent sample plots using GPS; measure parameters relating to forest biomass in the field using standardized procedures; reliably record all this data, analyse the collected data, draw conclusions and, retrieve the permanent sample plots for future assessment. The study also aimed to assess to what extent and for what tasks additional (external) support needed for these tasks. Furthermore, the study explored the long-term prospects for villagers to be able to carry out such tasks and what risks such as lack of accuracy, cheating etc would be involved.

The results demonstrated that after a short practical training the villagers with support from the local forest field staff were able to take all the plot measurements necessary for forest carbon stocks computations. The local communities were also able to retrieve and take plot measurements of the same trees in the following years. The project has also demonstrated that the measuring of sequestered carbon in community managed forest, by communities is technically feasible and economically viable.

Results of the carbon assessment in the study villages where apart from conserving the existing forests (carbon stocks), most of the forests were found to sequester considerable amount of carbon over time. This is most encouraging given that there are no rewards for the carbon sequestered. Currently most communities carrying out CBFM get certain access rights to fodder, firewood and poles. Given the levels of poverty prevailing in many villages, this may not be enough of an incentive.  Therefore, the communities want to explore selling their credits through the carbon market.

Forest carbon trading

The observed carbon stocks for the CBFM in Tanzania could potentially be traded through the noncompliance market. If carbon is priced at US$ 5 per ton of CO2, estimates show that an average village could earn US$ 6,500 or Tanzania Shs 8,125,000/= (at current exchange rate) annually from the sale of their forest carbon credits.

Since protecting the forest means losing out on other economic benefits that could be gained by forest clearance. The question is, whether payment for the carbon sequestered could make the difference, although in the long run, selling other environmental services, such as biodiversity and water protection might also be possible. The logical incentive package for CBFM would be to ‘bundle’ different forest services and sell them together, which would result in adding more values to CBFM projects and provide more benefits and tangible incentives to the local communities. An income of $6,500 from carbon alone is a considerable incentive however. The evidence from the field suggests that with good forest management (this comes easily with the right interventions package) greater benefits can be obtained through CBFM, and more carbon can be sequestered creating an upward spiral of incomes.

Next steps

The Minister for Natural Resources and Tourism recently established a team of experts to lend advice regarding the possibility of accessing carbon payments from reduced deforestation and degradation in the country. It will be necessary to establish a mechanism for registering the carbon sequestered from the numerous forests being managed through CBFM and modalities would need to be initiated for local communities practising CBFM to access funds for the services they generate. In order to overcome the cost burden (transaction costs) the communities need to be connected directly to the buyers, through a trustworthy and dependable clearinghouse and also to conduct the measurements themselves. For more information, contact Eliakamu Zahabu – zahabue@yahoo.com

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NATURE’S NURTURERS IN WESTERN UGANDA SEEKS TO MAKE THE CASE FOR AVOIDED DEFORESTATION AT UNFCCC COP 11 MEETING IN BALI

“Abalinda Ebihangwa” (translated in English as Nature’s Nurturers”)  is 1,687 acres of privately owned forest located in Hoima District in Western Uganda. The land is predominantly forest with some grassland areas. The land is owned by Mrs. Margaret Kyenkya. Her intentions are to preserve the forest in its natural state and one day sell the carbon credits generated by the forest– if the Kyoto Protocol adopts a mechanism for considering ‘avoided deforestation” as an action for mitigating climate change. Ms. Kyenkya also wants to establish an ecotourism site, and eventually a species rehabilitation programme on the land. This is one of the case studies that Uganda will be show-casing in Bali to make the case for avoided deforestation.

Due to an influx of newcomers from Congo, Rwanda and other areas of Uganda, the dynamics of the local population in the area are changing. With this comes increased pressure on the land for resources and new cultural activities. Forest exploitation, Illegal logging and hunting occur on an increasingly frequent basis, and neighbouring stands are slowly being depleted. Margaret has been informed that a truck load of her timber is worth Uganda Shs 270,000 (US 160.00) to illegal loggers.

Abalinda Ebihangwa’s biodiversity is noteworthy, with populations of chimpanzee, Grey-cheeked Mangabey primates, uncommon butterflies and birds, and rare tree species. Through Margaret’s pioneering work it is hoped that Abalinda Ebihangwa can be protected from this threat of severe habitat and biodiversity loss.

Currently six men are employed by Ms. Kyenkya to patrol the forest (at a cost of Uganda Shs 750,000 a month) in an attempt to stop the on-going illegal activities. They have come across illegal logging in action and have confiscated the loggers’ equipment. The presence of the patrol has limited these thefts, but has not yet stopped them fully. The patrol also deters hunting in the forest, an activity that could have a huge impact on the success of the tourism and conservation programme planned for Abalinda Ebihangwa.

For more details on the project, contact Margaret Kyenkya at farmers66@yahoo.com

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PES NEWS FROM ACROSS THE OCEAN

BRAZIL CLAIMS FIRST WITH CARBON AUCTION
Source: Reuters News; 26 September 2007

Brazil's largest city sold millions of dollars worth of carbon credits at an auction Wednesday in a deal that experts say paves the way for developing countries to make money fighting global warming. Brazil's Mercantile and Futures Exchange called Sao Paulo's sale of $18.5 million in carbon credits to Dutch-Belgian Fortis Bank the first such sale to be held on a regulated stock market and a significant step toward institutionalizing the carbon market.

The Belgian-Dutch financial group Fortis <FOR.BR> won the entire lot of 808,450 tonnes of carbon credits in the world's first spot market auction by a regulated exchange, Brazil's BM&F commodities exchange said Wednesday.  Fortis won the lot of certified emissions reduction certificates (CERs) with a bid of 16.20 euros per tonne, after the 14 international bidders drove up the minimum per tonne opening price of 12.70 euros.  The auctioned credits were created for Sao Paulo's government by a project at the Bandeirantes Landfill to generate energy from the methane gas produced by the tons of solid residues it receives per day. The project is run by privately held Biogas Energia Ambiental SA.

Although it's the first public auction of CERs, sales from Brazil have occurred on a business-to-business level, either through the credit holder seeking out a buyer or by a buyer soliciting a seller in Brazil. Before this sale, companies such as Fortis mostly purchased credits from individual sellers. Experts said the sale could be a major step toward creating a clearer system that could make buying and selling easier.

Brazil is No.3 in the world after China and India in Clean Development Mechanisms such as CERs, which were established under the Kyoto Protocol and allow developed countries to invest in emissions-reducing projects in developing countries.

Fortis has been positioning itself as a broker in the energy market, purchasing credits and selling them to companies that need to meet European pollution standards with offset carbon credits.

For the full story visit http://www.reutersinteractive.com/Carbon/76961

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THE COCA-COLA BRAZIL INSTITUTE'S RAINFOREST WATER PROGRAM PROMOTES THE RECOVERY OF WATERSHEDS BY REPLANTING RIPARIAN FORESTS
Source: CSRwire; September 26, 2007

 The Coca-Cola Brazil Institute's Rainforest Water Program promotes the recovery of watersheds by replanting riparian forests. It also sequesters carbon by planting trees and collaborates for a more pleasant climate by increasing native vegetation. The program was designed following the rules of the Kyoto Protocol, which includes the recovery of devastated forest areas. Therefore, the program emerged already with an additional possibility for resources to ensure its sustainability.

In its first phase alone, set to last five years, the program will promote the replanting of 3.3 million seedlings of native species along a 3,000-hectare area, involving investments of R$ 27 million (US$ 13.5 million) until 2011. The SOS Atlantic Forest Foundation (Fundação SOS Mata Atlântica), one of Brazil's most important environmental NGOs, is the partner responsible during the first phase of the program for mobilizing the landowners, promoting social engagement, monitoring the water quality (involving the participation of schools) and raising the local population's awareness as to the need to conserve rivers and forests. It therefore promotes educational activities and invites students and civil society organizations from the neighboring cities to help measure the quality of the river waters over the long term, using kits with chemical and physical reagents and monitoring the results. This action directly involves at least 800 local residents.

The pilot project was initiated with seedling in Serra do Japi, Alto Tietê, in São Paulo, the country’s most populated State and one which faces problems in terms of the quantity and quality of water available for collection and use.

The programs also includes the sponsorship of Coca-Cola FEMSA, the authorized manufacturer in Mexico, Argentina, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and in the regions of São Paulo and Mato Grosso do Sul in Brazil. The world’s largest Coca-Cola plant in terms of production capacity is headquartered in the city of Jundiaí, in a region near Serra do Japi, and belongs to FEMSA. Such actions fall in line with the objectives of the Coca-Cola Company, which announced a partnership with WWF on World Environment Day to recover the world's seven main watersheds and become neutral in terms of water use. The company also used the occasion to establish goals for water use, summarized by "The Three Rs:" Reduce, Recycle and Replenish.

For the full article see http://www.csrwire.com/PressRelease.php?id=976

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OTHER RELATED NEWS

PES POLICY ROUNDTABLE AT THE 9TH BIODIVERSITY AND ECONOMICS CONFERENCE

The 9th Biodiversity and Economics Conference was held at Kings College, Cambridge on September 20-21, 2007. The program included a Policy Roundtable on Payments for Ecosystem Services; Lessons Learned and the Road Ahead. The policy roundtable, organized by FAO, UNEP and IUCN, looked at issues ranging from how to scale up PES; social and equity impacts; and institutions for PES. Key conclusions from the meeting include:

  1. The need to increase spending on biodiversity protection, which is likely to be preceded by research on issues such as: willingness to pay; existence and option values for biodiversity, cost-effectiveness/efficiency; non-use values; and return on investment
  2. The need to scale up PES by possibly piggy backing on the success of the CDM. Ideas include exploring the establishment of a CDM-like mechanism for biodiversity; highlighting co-benefits from avoided deforestation; (but also addressing questions of additionality and leakage); and possibly selling “bundling”. There would be need to understand consumer preferences- Do consumers want it? Can they distinguish the bundled attributes? Who would buy and what would motivate them?
  3. Understanding the Social Impacts of PES - does PES really serves the poor? The poor are heavily dependent on the ecosystems, and have limited opportunities for substitutes. PES has the potential to reverse the decline –but since it is context driven – can it really be used as a tool for poverty reduction? Or is it just a market tool ---that needs supporting institutions to deal with the equity issues? A Social Impact Assessment of PES needs to be carried out. One question to answer would be whether the poor receive benefits from the ecosystem sale – and are the benefits commensurate to the access they had before the pricing mechanism was introduced? One idea that could be researched is “weighted sharing” of the prospects from PES – based on dependency and role in participation and design. .

Participants also raised questions such as:

a) Should we only be thinking of rescuing ecosystems in danger? How about providing incentives to create ecosystem services?
b) Should we pay for actions? Or the end product? – If we pay for the actions, then a lot of monitoring is needed to ensure the actions lead to the desired ecosystem service, Is this cost-efficient or practical?

For more information on the conference and full conference proceedings visit www.biodiversityeconomics.org

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UN TARGETS AFRICA WITH ONLINE "BAZAAR" FOR CARBON
Source: Planet Ark News; September 7, 2007

The United Nations environment agencies have launched a virtual marketplace to bring together buyers and sellers of carbon offsets in rich and poor countries. Through carbon trading under the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, rich countries can meet domestic emissions goals by buying carbon offsets from developing nations. That trade, worth US$5 billion last year, has so far largely focused on a handful of chemical plants in China and India, which have been able to cut their greenhouse gas output relatively inexpensively.

Africa has seen just 2.7 % of all carbon offset projects approved by the UN's climate change secretariat, and it's hoped the new "bazaar" website will help overcome a local lack of resources and foreign reluctance to invest.

"If the benefits are to be more widely shared, especially in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa, more efforts need to be put into building developing-country capacity," said Achim Steiner, executive director at the United Nations Environment Programme. "The CDM Bazaar is therefore a very welcome new networking initiative."

The bazaar, which can be accessed at http://www.cdmbazaar.net/default.asp, will allow developers to advertise their projects and so stimulate competitive bidding for their carbon offsets.

For more information see http://www.planetark.com/dailynewsstory.cfm/newsid/44198/story.htm

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GROWING SUPPORT FOR USING CARBON OFFSETTING TO FUND TROPICAL FOREST PROTECTION
Source: Reuters; September 12, 2007

The use of carbon offsetting as a way to fund tropical forest protection drew backing from a range of environmental and research groups ahead of international climate change talks in December.
Reuters reports that demand for carbon offsets is growing from large Western businesses, and mobilizing such private sector finance to protect forests is gathering support. Companies want to be seen to be green by paying others to cut emissions of greenhouse gases on their behalf.

Environmental organizations grouped under the Global Canopy Program (GCP), and including Friends of the Earth Brazil and Care International, on Sept. 14 called for such funding under a successor to the Kyoto Protocol after 2013.

The World Bank has announced it plans to pilot projects in Papua New Guinea, Costa Rica, Indonesia and elsewhere, allowing countries earn offsets in return for not chopping down their forests.

An informal meeting of policymakers recently held in Berlin, led by U.N. climate change envoy and former Chilean President Ricardo Lagos, called for forest protection to "be included in a post-2012 climate change regime", for example using carbon markets.

"The growing market for carbon offers great opportunities for linking greenhouse gas mitigation with conservation of forests and biodiversity, and the generation of local livelihoods," WWF and IIED said in a briefing paper, adding it was important local people, and not just speculators, benefited.

Trees, often cleared to provide land for livestock or biofuel crops like rapeseed, are around 50 percent carbon and release carbon dioxide (CO2) when they rot or burn.

For more on this article see http://www.reuters.com/article/latestCrisis/idUSL1154344. To read the WWF/IIED report, log on to http://www.reutersinteractive.com/carbon

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LUFTHANSA, SWISS & QANTAS INTRODUCE CARBON OFFSETTING
Source: Business Traveler; 26 September 2007
  
Lufthansa, Swiss and Qantas have become the latest airlines to offer customers the option of calculating and offsetting their carbon emissions when booking flights. Few details are as yet available from Qantas, but the scheme introduced by Lufthansa (and its subsidiary Swiss) compares favourably with those offered by the likes of British Airways, Silverjet and Easyjet.

Firstly, Lufthansa has chosen as its partner Myclimate, a Swiss offset provider run on a non-profit basis, whereas the leading UK providers Climate Care (British Airways) and Carbon Neutral (Silverjet) are for-profit companies.

In addition, all funds raised by Lufthansa's scheme will go to designated projects, run by Myclimate, which meet the highest standards set by the UN's Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) for certification. By comparison, Climate Care and Carbon Neutral provide reductions in the unregulated – and more controversial – voluntary market, while Easyjet buys direct in the certified emissions reductions (CER) market, but doesn't get involved in setting up projects.

Initially, funds raised by Lufthansa's scheme will go towards two projects in India which reduce emissions through the production of electricity from biomass (agricultural waste) instead of coal and diesel. One project, located in Karnataka, southern India, was the first worldwide to meet the criteria for the CDM's Gold Standard, which guarantees social as well as ecological sustainability. The second, in Bihar, is currently passing through the CDM registration process.

Lufthansa is also the first airline to distinguish between the impact of economy, business and first class passengers in its online calculator (which is based on the emissions of the whole group's fleet over the course of a month). Like BA, however, the German carrier has stopped short of applying a "radiative forcing" multiplier to allow for the effect of emissions being produced at altitude, as recommended by some climate scientists and as used by both Myclimate and Climate Care in their own calculators.

Qantas has also chosen not to use a multiplier in its online calculator, but has broken new ground by including its ground operations as well as its aircraft when calculating emissions on each flight sector. The group has achieved certification under the Australian Government's Greenhouse Friendly initiative, but has yet to choose a long-term partner for its scheme. A spokesperson said: "We have a short list for our ongoing programme, which is soon to be finalised. Suppliers are Australian Greenhouse Office accredited and programmes are not Qantas-specific at this stage."

Passengers should note, however, that the Australian government currently gives accreditation to offset providers which run reforestation schemes - indeed to mark the launch of the initiative, Qantas offset all its flights on September 19 by putting funds towards CO2 Australia's project to plant 90,000 eucalyptus trees. Since trees only remove carbon from the atmosphere temporarily, most major European offset providers have switched to energy-based projects which prevent emissions.

For the full story see http://www.businesstraveller.com/default.asp?Page=3&PUB=67&ISS=24114&SID=694367&LS=EMS142093 and for more information go to lufthansa.com, swiss.com, myclimate.org, qantas.com.

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BUSINESS LEADERS CALL FOR PUBLIC POLICIES THAT LEVERAGE FOREST CARBON CYCLE
Source: GreenBiz.com, 20 September 2007

A group of World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) member companies is calling for public policies that make the best use of the forestry sector's carbon profile and carbon cycle.

The Sustainable Forest Products Industry (SFPI) working group proposes six key points that those responsible for devising forestry and carbon policies need to know, and it highlights the carbon opportunities and challenges facing the sector in its publication, "The Sustainable Forest Products Industry, Carbon and Climate Change: Key messages for policy-makers."

Specifically, the SFPI calls on policy-makers to:

  • Support public policies that promote accelerated depreciation rates so that companies can invest in energy- and carbon-intensity improvements
  • Promote the efficient use of biomass through the value chain including recycling, extraction of energy and wise use of limited land resources
  • Promote biomass energy as an important component of policies to control atmospheric CO2 based on adequate supplies of fresh fiber and increased recovery of used wood and fiber
  • Create public policies and carbon crediting schemes that recognize all activities that accomplish real and verifiable reductions in atmospheric greenhouse gases
  • Carefully evaluate public policies for unintended consequences, particularly those adverse to the goals of achieving reductions in atmospheric concentrations of carbon and supporting a sustainable forest products industry
  • Expand efforts to bring more of the world's forests under sustainable management as a means of reducing carbon emissions.

The SFPI recognizes that opportunities abound in the forestry sector to maximize the sector's contribution to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, including breakthrough technologies to significantly reduce energy consumption within the industry.

But with the opportunities also come challenges, such as managing the complex connections between the industry and the global carbon cycle, where hastily enacted climate change policies can have unintended consequences, and the fact that the industry is capital intensive, making it difficult and expensive to change technology in response to short-term policy measures.

Additionally, rapidly growing interest in using wood and other types of biomass for fuels and bio-based products creates competition for the industry's primary raw material and the land where it grows.

This means that bringing more of the world's forests under sustainable management is a critically important mitigation strategy, and the working group urges all climate stakeholders - governments, development agencies, non-governmental organizations and the private sector - to support and implement appropriate policies that reduce deforestation in developing countries and encourage active reforestation.

This article is reproduced with kind permission of GreenBiz.com.For daily news and articles visit www.greenbiz.com.Visit GreenBuzz to subscribe to GreenBiz.com's free newsletter.

 

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UPCOMING EVENTS

31 October 2007
ONE DAY TECHNICAL CONFERENCE ENERGY AND SUSTAINABILITY, Cape Town, South Africa
 For more information, contact Douw Willemse - douw.willemse@eskom.co.za ______________________________________

November 22-23, 2007
INTERNATIONAL REGIME, AVOIDED DEFORESTATION AND THE EVOLUTION OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FOREST POLICIES IN THE SOUTH. PARIS, FRANCE
Towards an International Forest Regime through the Convergence of Public Policies and the Rise of Private Initiatives.  For more information see www.iufro.org/events/rss/ -______________________________________

13th – 15th November, 2007
CARBON MARKETS AFRICA - THE PAVILION CONFERENCE CENTRE, CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA
Join leading climate change experts at Carbon Markets Africa and find out:

  • What is being done to develop the market for CDM projects in Africa with policy and market updates from the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, South African Designated National Authority, Department of Trade and Industry and the UNFCCC
  • How business leaders are generating new revenue streams from trading carbon emissions with commercial case studies from Sasol Nitro, AES Nitrates and the Anglo American
  • What financing options are available for CDM project developers with expert input from Investec Bank, BNP Paribas, Standard Bank and the Development Bank of South Africa
  • » How can the voluntary carbon market help sustainable and social development?

The workshop will also include a Project Developer Coaching Seminar -on, 13th November 2007 which will provide prospective project developers with an in-depth introduction to the carbon markets.  Attendees will learn best practice ways to develop projects that are attractive to the carbon credit buyers, providing a roadmap for successfully entering the market.

For more on these two events see /www.greenpowerconferences.com/carbonmarkets/carbonmarkets_capetown07.html?gclid=CPzGxPqTjY4CFQQdEgodWD1gDw______________________________________

19th – 21s November, 2007
POVERTY AND ENVIRONMENT PARTNERSHIP MEETING, WASHINGTON DC. For more see www.povertyandenvironment.net______________________________________

3rd – 6th December, 2007
6TH TANZANIA WILDLIFE RESEARCH INSTITUTE ( TAWIRI ) SCIENTIFIC CONFERENCE; Arusha, Tanzania. Conference theme is "Consequences of Global Environmental Changes to Natural Ecosystems".
Abstracts are invited on the following conference sub themes;-
* Environmental changes and conservation.
* Biodiversity and Monitoring
* Wildlife diseases
* Human-wildlife Interactions
* Wildlife ecology and behavior
* Wildlife socio-economics and ecotourism

Deadline for submitting abstracts is: Friday August 30th, 2007. Abstracts should be sent to:
conference@tawiri.org . For more information see: www.tawiri.org

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RESOURCES AND TOOLS

GUIDELINES FOR QUANTIFYING GHG REDUCTIONS FROM GRID-CONNECTED ELECTRICITY PROJECTS

Quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions benefits of renewable energy and energy-efficiency projects is now easier with the release of a new supplement to WRI's Greenhouse Gas Protocol. The Guidelines for Quantifying GHG Reductions from Grid-Connected Electricity Projects is a how-to manual that allows project developers - and developers of carbon offset standards - to credibly and transparently estimate GHG emission reductions on power grids.

Click Here for Details... ______________________________________

US ENVIRONMENTAL PTROTECTION AGENCY 2007 INVENTORY OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND SINKS

Prepared annually by EPA, the national greenhouse gas inventory report presents estimates of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and sinks for the years 1990 through 2005. This report also discusses the methods and data used to calculate the emission estimates

www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/usinventoryreport.html

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NEW PUBLICATIONS

Equal Exchange: Determining a Fair Price for Carbon

The Dutch-funded Capacity Development for the CDM (CD4CDM) Project, being implemented by UNEP RISOE Centre, has released a new annual publication entitled the Perspectives Series which aims at communicating insights and visions of leading actors in the carbon market to better inform the decisions of policymakers and practitioners in developing countries on CDM and carbon market issues.

The theme of the 2007 issue is Equal Exchange: Determining a Fair Price for Carbon. The publication includes contributions from a geographically and functionally diversified group of carbon market stakeholders offering their perspectives on the CDM market - its structure, dynamics, and likely evolution and how these and other factors, such as risk and financing influence the negotiation power of CDM project sponsors. Through this publication, the CD4CDM project aims at assisting project
stakeholders to maximize the benefits accruing to all parties through more equitable transactions.
 
The document can be downloaded from:  http://www.cd4cdm.org/
Also available in the Publications Section of the UNFCCC CDM Bazaar: http://www.cdmbazaar.net/______________________________________

Climate Change: The Final Blow for Agriculture in Africa?

This study—the first to analyze climate impact and adaptation across the African continent and to combine cross-country observed and simulated data— provides economic insights into the magnitude of the impact and the value of adaptation. The results suggest that large regions of marginal agriculture in Africa may be forced out of production by 2100, while others will thrive. Millions of agriculture-dependent, water-deprived people in the most vulnerable countries will need information, technologies, and supporting institutions to adapt to further climate deterioration. Some countries being more vulnerable than others, help must be focused where it is needed most.

The full paper is available HERE

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

FINANCIAL LEADERSHIP IN CARBON MARKETS – EXECUTIVE RECOGNITION

During UNEP FI's forthcoming Global Roundtable in Melbourne, Australia, on 24-25th October, 2007 four executive awards will be given to recognise executives within the financial services who have contributed in a significant manner to the development of financial ideas, innovative products, institutional change and or the carbon markets themselves.

One executive award will be given for each of the following sectors:

1. Insurance/reinsurance
2. Asset management
3. Pension funds
4. Banking
5. Civil society:

In addition, one award will be given for a representative from a non-financial institution who has collaborated with or supported financial service companies towards the same end.

Entries will be no longer than one page and will be submitted on the form downloaded from the UNEP FI website. Both self-nominations and nominations by colleagues or associates will be accepted. A short-list of fifteen entries will be judged by a small group of UNEP FI's long-term climate change advisors; the five awards will be announced at the UNEP FI Melbourne Global Roundtable Gala Dinner on 24th October.

If you would like to know more or nominate someone for recognition at the UNEP FI event in Melbourne then visit www.unepfi.org/carbon-leadership to download the entry pack or send an e-.mail to carbon-leadership@unepfi.org. Entry deadline - Close of Business, Tuesday, 16 October, 2007

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NEWSLETTERS

We invite you to look at the Katoomba Group’s other newsletters.

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