December 2007

FROM THE EDITOR
Dear Katoomba Members,

Greetings and welcome to the December 2007 edition of the East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group e-newsletter.  

Our newsletter aims to keep our readers aware of the latest news and events relating to markets and payments for ecosystem services (PES) around the world.

We welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions, including any articles that you may wish to share with our readers.

Please send them by e-mail to aruhweza@forest-trends.org

Yours sincerely

Alice Ruhweza
Coordinator, East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. ESA KATOOMBA NEWS

2. NEW PES-RELATED INFORMATION FROM VARIOUS COUNTRIES IN THE REGION

4. OTHER RELATED NEWS

5. UPCOMING EVENTS

6.  NEW PUBLICATIONS, RESOURCES & TOOLS

ESA KATOOMBA NEWS

THE KATOOMBA GROUP LAUNCHING NEW WEBSITE MID-DECEMBER!

The Katoomba Group is launching a new website to provide an interactive space where members can connect with others working on PES around the world. It is our hope that the site will enable people working on PES to share and build ideas together, seek help from others; offer their expertise, and contribute information and tools to continue to build the state of knowledge and work on payments for ecosystem services.

In addition, the new website will provide specific information on the background, vision and current initiatives of the regional Katoomba groups in Africa, Latin America, China, and North America. It will also allow members to search other Katoomba resources such as the Ecosystem Marketplace. The website will also provide access to vast resources related to ecosystem services through the “PES Learning Tools Page”. 

Finally, the new website will provide an opportunity for members to sign-up, fill in form that highlights areas of expertise, needs and interests. Members can also decide if they are interested in being part of the “Rapid Response Mechanism”– which makes available their expertise to help other Katoomba Group partner’s projects. 

We hope you enjoy the new site which will be reachable at http://www.katoombagroup.org later this month.

For any questions and feedback, please email Rachel Miller at rmiller@forest-trends.org  

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NEW PES-RELATED INFORMATION FROM COUNTRIES IN THE REGION

A CARBON TRUST TO SAFEGUARD CARBON INCOME IN MOZAMBIQUE

The Mozambique Carbon Livelihoods Trust (MCLT) was launched in 2007 to ensure that the community and individual farmer proceeds of carbon offset sales from Envirotrade Carbon Livelihoods projects in Mozambique were safeguarded. The Fund will also be known in Mozambique as the "Fundacao Carbono Para Vida".

Approximately one third of the proceeds of any carbon sale go directly to this fund and are paid out to individual farmers over seven years, to the community trust funds annually and in other payments for forest management and conservation.

The MCLT board is made up of stakeholders - a representative of each elected community association participating in a project, Envirotrade and WWF Mozambique - and is responsible for ensuring that the funds are properly managed and payments made. At the outset this will mean a representative of the Nhambita Community Association and later representatives of other community associations who sign MOU's with the Carbon Livelihoods programme in Mozambique. A Beira based auditing company, Contabil, is responsible for the day to day administration of the fund.

The Trust will publish an annual report and its transactions will be monitored by BioClimate Research and Development (BR&D), an Edinburgh based organisation responsible for the Plan Vivo certification as part of its ongoing monitoring of standards and requirements for compliance. The MCLT is an important component of the Plan Vivo system and ensures that Payments for Environmental Services (PES) take place in an environment in which future payments to participants are protected and guaranteed.

The Carbon Livelihoods Trust will work closely with associated community associations to ensure that the sustainable livelihoods are built and that far reaching land-use change takes place in target communities in and around protected areas. Trust Fund Account is functional and as of July 16th, 2007 and USD$ 92,613- USD had been paid into the account. The fund account will be managed by an independent company (Contabil) in close association with the board of the MCLT.

For more information visit the website that has been launched - www.carbon-livelihoods.org  or visit
http://www.envirotrade.co.uk/Pages/mozambique_sustdevel.htm

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ENVIROTRADE TAKES ITS SUCCESSFUL PES MODEL FOR CARBON LIVELIHOODS TO THE ZAMBEZI DELTA

Envirotrade has launched two new projects in the Zambezi Delta and Qurimbas National Park working with four communities living in and around protected areas. The new projects will bring Payments for Environmental Services (PES) to communities in the Zambezi delta through a comprehensive land use change programme. Local farmers and forest communities manage the planting and growth of trees in return for proceeds from the sale of CO2 offsets to customers in the developed world.

The new projects are part of Envirotrade's Carbon Livelihoods Programme which addresses poverty alleviation, sustainable development and biodiversity conservation while also tackling global warming in conservation areas recovering from protracted conflict. The Programme enables individuals and companies to effectively invest in new forests and agroforestry that will absorb the carbon dioxide generated by their business activities. Envirotrade works with forest farmers to change the way their land is used, and help them to boost their crop yields by the cultivation of nitrogen-fixing trees and plants, which enrich the soil and slow down deforestation.

It is hoped that the new projects will replicate the success of Nhambita. The Nhambita Community Carbon project in the buffer zone of Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park involved reforesting abandoned "mashambas" (areas of land "slashed and burned " for crop planting and deserted due to soil degradation) with indigenous Miombo woodland trees, primarily local fruit and bee-fodder species, and other selected trees along watersheds to help stabilise the riverbanks. Local people contract with the project to plant and maintain trees amongst their crops and around their homesteads. The local people are then paid for carbon stored by the trees they plant, forest they manage and fire they prevent.

The project has sold over 500 000 tC02--to clients that include Creative Artists Agency of Los Angeles, the MAN Group, U&W, IIED and the Live Earth Concert in Johannesburg--in the past four years. This project was supported by the University of Edinburgh and the Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Management.

For more information visit www.envirotrade.co.uk or E-mail mail@envirotrade.co.uk

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THE COMMONWEALTH HEADS OF GOVERNMENT MEETING IN UGANDA PRODUCES A “CLIMATE ACTION PLAN” AND POSITIONS FOR BALI

Commonwealth leaders meeting in Uganda on 24th November issued a "Climate Action Plan", and prepared positions for the UNFCCC Conference of Parties meeting in Bali. Below are some excerpts from the statement:-

“We, the Heads of Government of the Commonwealth, are gravely concerned about the threat that climate change represents to human security and economic wellbeing…………….Accordingly, we are resolved, individually and collectively, to pursue active participation through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), caucusing together and leveraging from our shared vision and diversity to the fullest extent possible. …….Our shared goal should be to achieve a comprehensive post-2012 global agreement that strengthens, broadens and deepens current arrangements and leads to reduced emissions of global greenhouse gases……
 
We are also resolved, individually and collectively, to pursue the following actions, which should also inform our positions at Bali:

  • Pursuit of initiatives to strengthen the quality and participation levels at international negotiations on climate change, such as assisting Commonwealth developing countries with their national negotiating capacity.
  • Promotion of Commonwealth work, drawing on our networks of professional associations and other resources, to strengthen consideration of the human and economic aspects of climate change.
  • Support for improved land use management, including conservation and sustainable use of forest resources. This should comprise market-based mechanisms and compensatory measures for the preservation of standing forests; provisions for reforestation and afforestation; and measures to combat illegal logging and other causes of deforestation. In this regard, the Commonwealth’s commitment to the Iwokrama Rainforest Programme is renewed and efforts should continue to be pursued to widen international knowledge and support of it.
  • Work to study and make recommendations on issues related to the sustainability of fresh agricultural produce in respect of transported exports, particularly from developing countries, with a view to securing more sound information on carbon footprints related to the export of fresh produce.
  • Renewed efforts to support natural disaster management in member countries. This should include further consideration of insurance proposals for small island states, including those of the Commonwealth Disaster Management Agency, while the Commonwealth Secretariat should continue its work to strengthen natural disaster management in member countries in conjunction with other international efforts.
  • The provision of technical assistance and other support, particularly to least developed countries and vulnerable small states, to assess the implications of climate change and the benefits of building adaptation into all aspects of national planning and budgeting, wherever feasible and practical..”

 

For the full statement and to read more about the meeting, visit http://www.chogm2007.org/uganda

 

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SOUTH AFRICA PLANS TO CASH IN ON CARBON
Source: Environmental Finance; November 1, 2007

South Africa has lagged other developing countries in gaining a foothold in the growing carbon market, but a government-backed company launched in London in early November is hoping to redress the balance. The company, CEF Carbon Markets, will act as a developer of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction projects, provide project finance and market the resulting carbon credits, according to Deven Pillay, a former group advisor on climate change and energy efficiency at BP, who will lead the firm’s London office.

“CEF Carbon is keen to ensure that South Africa is better placed in this market and also to contribute towards the goals of mitigating climate change,” said the firm, a division of Central Energy Fund, a South African state-owned energy company. Pillay said the business will take equity stakes in projects developed by CEF and others, and act as adviser to other project developers. He said there was a lack of understanding and awareness of CDM in Africa that CEF Carbon could help address.

As a government-backed entity, it can also bring financial certainty to carbon project deals. “The fact that CEF is investing in these projects means that counterparty risk is greatly reduced,” Pillay said.

CEF Carbon is looking to build a diverse portfolio of projects in renewable energy, landfill gas capture, energy efficiency, waste-to-energy and biofuels, which will generate CERs or verified emissions reductions for the voluntary market. Pillay said the current pipeline of projects will produce around 5 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emission reductions each year. He expected this pipeline to grow, but declined to reveal any targets.

For more information on this story visit http://www.environmental-finance.com/onlinews/1101sou.html

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NEW WEBSITE TO FOCUS ON AFRICAN CARBON MARKET.

 Carbon Finance Africa, a website aimed at stimulating and facilitating the carbon market in Africa was launched at the Carbon Markets Africa conference in Cape Town, South Africa, on the 14th of November.  The website, the first of its kind to focus solely on Africa, is a non-profit initiative developed by Africa Practice and Marbek Resource Consulting with the support of the Royal Netherlands Embassy, South Africa.

 By posting CDM project details on Carbon Finance Africa, developing-country CDM project proponents can expect competitive offers from carbon credit buyers.  Listed projects will be supplemented by a team of associates working throughout sub-Saharan Africa who will source high quality projects specifically for the website. This innovative and free to use matchmaking facility, ensures strict confidentiality for listed projects. Only once registered, can users browse through the list of investors and project developers.

For more information visit www.carbonfinanceafrica.org.za or email admin@carbonfinanceafrica.org

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OTHER RELATED NEWS

THE VOLUNTARY CARBON STANDARD (VCS) LAUNCHES IN LONDON

On November 19th, 2007, the Climate Group, the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA), and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) announced the official launch of the Voluntary Carbon Standard at the London Stock Exchange. According to the press release, "The rigor and transparency of the new VCS will boost market confidence for many companies and individuals keen to take a lead on tackling climate change by going carbon-neutral.  The robust international standard will drive greater investment into credible offset projects certain to result in real and additional emissions reductions around the world."

Two years in the making, the VCS is expected by many to become the leading offset standard in the voluntary market.

For the full press release visit http://www.ecosystemmarketplace.com/media/pdf/191107_Embargoed_Press_Release_VCS_Launch_FINAL.pdf

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CARBON TRADING SCHEMES LAUNCH GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP
Source: Environmental Finance

Carbon emissions trading schemes worldwide have launched a new partnership to collaborate on design issues and help build a global carbon market. The International Carbon Action Partnership (ICAP) held its first meeting in Lisbon, Portugal recently. High-level representatives from countries and regions that have, or are implementing, carbon cap-and-trade schemes met to sign an agreement on sharing experiences and best practices on the design of such schemes.

The founding partners include nine EU member state that participate in the region’s Emissions Trading Scheme, five US states that will embrace the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the US and Canadian states forming the Western Climate Initiative (WCI), as well as New Zealand and Norway.
The organization will provide a forum where ideas and experiences regarding cap-and-trade systems can be exchanged, particularly regarding best practices and scheme design. ICAP will also foster compatibility between national carbon markets, laying the foundation for a global carbon market.
"Linking current and emerging carbon markets at a global level establishes a level playing field for covered sectors and a consistent regulatory framework across national borders. Through this sharing, ICAP enhances the design of other market-based schemes by ensuring compatibility of design issues at an early stage", according to the ICAP website.

EU Environment Commissioner Stavros Dimas hailed ICAP as a sign that "an increasing number of countries and regions around the world have put in place a carbon market or will do so soon and that it is time for others to join us in credible and stringent efforts to combat climate change."

The Commission, which yesterday announced a 2.08 billion tonne CO2 cap for the 2008-2012 trading period of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), is hoping that the 3-14 December UN climate negotiations in Bali will prove to be the first step towards an eventual global emissions trading scheme to replace the Kyoto Protocol in 2013. EU member states will adopt today (30 October) in Lisbon their conclusions on the EU's objectives for the Bali meeting.

Premier Gordon Campbell of British Columbia, which is part of the WCI, said: “Tackling global warming requires international cooperation and collaboration unlike anything we have seen before. It is vitally important that as we design our own market systems we coordinate with other provinces, states, nations and continents. “The partnership we have signed today opens the door, for the first time ever, to jurisdictions around the globe to share ideas and new technologies, and ultimately will lay the foundation for a compatible market-based system to trade carbon offsets and credits worldwide,” he said.

ICAP's main tasks will be to monitor and exchange information about international carbon trading systems, providing a basis for the eventual coordination of a wider, global system in which different cap-and-trade mechanisms are linked together. ICAP’s first public workshop will be held in 2008 and it is seeking to engage business and NGOs in its activities.

For more on this story, visit thttp://www.environbusiness.com/News/Current1/icap.html

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INNOVEST RECOGNIZED BY UNEP- FI FOR THEIR CARBON WORK
Source: CSRwire; November 5, 2007

The United Nations Environment Program's Finance Initiative selected Innovest as the recipient of the "Innovation and Contribution to Carbon Finance Award”. Innovest received the special award at the United Nations Environment Program Financial Initiative (UNEP-FI) Global Roundtable in Melbourne, Australia on Oct 24. The award was given in recognition of three particular contributions from Innovest:

  • Writing each of the five global reports for the Carbon Disclosure Project since its inception
  • Developing the Carbon Beta risk model to analyze companies' net financial risk exposure from climate change, and applying it to 1,500 companies worldwide
  • Developing (with JP Morgan ) the world's first "climate risk-adjusted" bond index, based on Innovest's Carbon Beta model

For the full story visit http://www.csrwire.com/PressRelease.php?id=10068
For more information about Innovest's work in Carbon Finance, visit www.innovestgroup.com or contact Peter Trevet: ptrevet@innovestgroup.com

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VIRGIN ATLANTIC OFFERS ONBOARD CARBON OFFSETS
Source: Business Traveler; November 8, 2007

Virgin Atlantic has become the first airline to sell carbon offsets as part of its in-flight service. Virgin customers have the option of offsetting their carbon emissions both onboard and during the booking process. Paul Charles, director of corporate communications at Virgin, said: “Our Challenge is to make it as easy as possible for people to offset, something airlines have failed to do in the past. It will be interesting to see what demand is really out there.”

The British carrier has launched its scheme in association with Myclimate, a prestigious, non-profit Swiss organisation which also provides offsets for Lufthansa. Proceeds will go towards projects run by Myclimate which have achieved Gold Standard certification, the most respected accreditation in the offsetting industry.

Initially, Virgin is supporting one project in India to turn farming waste into electricity, as well as a hydropower plant in Indonesia – the former is regulated under the UN’s Clean Development Mechanism, while the latter is a voluntary scheme.

To calculate the emissions per passenger, Virgin has worked out the amount of CO2 produced by aircraft on each of its routes, based on data from 2006. The carrier has followed Lufthansa’s lead in making a distinction between premium and economy passengers in calculating emissions, to take into account the difference in weights of equipment and seats in each cabin.

Where Virgin breaks new ground is in being the first airline to offer customers the option of using a “radiative forcing” multiplier to allow for the effect of non-CO2 emissions. Charles explained: “We aren’t using a multiplier on our basic calculator, because there’s still a lot of ongoing debate about it in the scientific community. However, we are allowing customers to use a multiplier of two to account for the non-CO2 impact if they want, and details will be given in the in-flight information.”

For more details, see http://www.businesstraveller.com/news/virgin-offers-onboard-offsets

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DEBATE ON CARBON FOOTPRINT OF IMPORTED FOODS FROM DEVELOPING COUNTRIES CONTINUES
Source: Reuters; November 7, 2007

The concept of "food miles," i.e. the impact of transporting food from the producer the consumer, has prompted campaigns for buying local while leaving fresh produce or cut flowers flown in from developing countries out of the shopping bag. Air freighted products are believed to have the biggest impact, with carbon emissions from air freighting ranging between 40 and 200 times greater than those of goods shipped by sea or road.

The debate has prompted strong warnings from Africa in particular since ending imports of fresh food from Africa risks destroying entire communities that have become dependent on the food trade,

"We do understand, of course, that our friends here are anxious to make a difference. However, the figures simply do not add up," said Annan Cato, Ghana’s High Commissioner to Britain - noting that less than 0.1 percent of Britain's carbon emissions relate to air freighted food.

"At what cost to global justice do we shut the door on the economic prospects of small farmers in Africa by refusing to buy their produce," he told a meeting of artists, musicians and scientists to discuss global warming's impact on Africa.

Environmentalists recommend that as much food as possible should be produced and consumed locally, ending air freighted imports of fruit and vegetables from around the world. But development specialists note that much of the produce comes from the poorer parts of Africa and that whole communities have become dependent on the lucrative lifeline.

However, Cato argues that "There are many other ways for the British shopper to reduce their carbon footprint without damaging the livelihoods of thousands of poor African farming families. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions must be done in a fair, scientific and rational way -- making cuts at the expense of the world's poorest is not only unjust, it is a bad basis for building the international consensus needed for a global deal on climate change,"

The Kenya High Commission in London drew attention to the development benefits its emergent perishable goods industry provides, which supports one million Kenyans. They have launched a campaign dubbed 'Grown under the Sun' to inform British consumers about the development benefits associated with sourcing fresh produce from Kenya. The Kenya High Commission called for a sense of proportion, quoting UK Trade and Development minister Gareth Thomas who said that “driving around six miles to a supermarket to buy some Kenyan green beans emits the same amount of carbon as air-freighting that pack of green beans.”

Bill Vorley of the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) in the UK agreed with Kenya and Ghana. He cautioned against the rejection of food imports from developing countries based on climate concerns. He stressed that the economic and social benefits of these exports are significant to the producers -- often in countries that will be most harshly affected by climate change without having contributed to its causes -- and said developed-country consumers "should focus their behaviour change on the remaining 99.9 percent of their climate-change footprint, by reducing things such as energy use and leisure flights."

Meanwhile, this debate may also present problems to schemes such as the East Africa Organic Standard. The Soil Association, the largest organic group in the UK, is considering whether to stop certifying airlifted products as organic due to their climate impact, or to use special labels or carbon offsetting schemes for such products. Anna Bradley, chair of the Soil Association Standards Board said that "As awareness of climate change has grown, concerns have been raised about the damage caused to the environment by air freight." However, noting that, the export of fresh organic produce provides significant development benefits and opportunities for export-led growth for some of the poorest and most vulnerable countries in the world, she added that  "when reducing our impact on the world's climate we must carefully consider the social and economic benefits of air freight for international development and the growth of the organic market as a whole."

For more information see Bridges Biores; http://www.ictsd.org/biores

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IFC AND DONOR PARTNERS TO LEVERAGE PRIVATE SECTOR POTENTIAL IN ADDRESSING CLIMATE CHANGE
Source: CSRwire; October 19, 2007

IFC and its donor partners called for an aggressive approach to leveraging private sector capital and innovation against climate change at the recent World Bank-IMF Annual Meetings. IFC management and representatives from donor countries agreed that the private sector can play a greater role to mitigate the impact of climate change and that IFC can catalyze this potential by supporting market-based solutions, encouraging public-private partnerships, and raising awareness with private companies.

"Climate change is a threat to economic development, and developing countries are especially vulnerable," said Lars Thunell, IFC Executive Vice President and CEO. "The private sector can do more, and IFC, in partnership with donor countries, can lead the way in creating new financial tools and other market-based solutions to climate change."

"The impact of climate change on private sector growth is not yet fully understood, especially at the firm level," said Rachel Kyte, IFC Director of Environment and Social Development. "IFC is exploring how it can help its client companies move to less carbon-intensive growth and looking at what additional standards financial institutions can use to drive best practice among their clients."

During the meetings, IFC presented a first outline of its climate change strategy which includes creating a new methodology to measure the impact on climate change of its entire investment portfolio; helping its clients assess their climate change vulnerability and to look at the ways private companies in emerging markets can adapt. The IFC strategy will be an integral part of the World Bank Group's climate change strategy which will be presented in early 2008.

.In 2007, IFC supported 27 projects that had a substantial renewable energy or energy efficiency investment component. The total amount of clean energy investment represented by these projects was $2 billion.
.
For more information visit www.ifc.org

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT! PEP WORKING GROUP AND FOCAL POINT ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND PAYMENTSFOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

During the XI Poverty and Environment Partnership (PEP) meeting in June 2007 in Copenhagen, one of the recommendations of the session devoted to Ecosystem Services (ES) and Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) was to put in place a PEP Working Group on ecosystem services (ES) and PES. Recognizing that many institutions represented at PEP are already doing a lot on ES/PES, it was clear that this Working Group should neither duplicate, nor substitute them. Instead, the Working Group could be a clearing house to identify and inform PEP members and other stakeholders about shared opportunities to use ES and PES to promote the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in general, and sustainable development and poverty alleviation in particular.

The Working Group activities include (a) to identify and briefly communicate to PEP members who is doing what on ES and PES that may be of interest to the PEP perspective; (b) to identify opportunities to educate donor agencies, recipient countries, and others on ES and PES opportunities for poverty reduction and environment conservation; (c) to identify opportunities to engage national governments and businesses to promote pro-poor ES and PES approaches; (d) to facilitate communication between ES and PES practitioners and the donor community; (e) to identify specific education or communication activities that PEP itself may want to undertake or promote in this field; (f) to undertake or commission short term activities/products in support of the previous points.
 
The Working Group will be a virtual group, communicating mostly through the internet as well as through presentations, discussions, and other activities at PEP meetings or similar events. Participants come both from donor agencies and conservation NGOs, with occasional guest contributors at specific events or activities.

Following suit on this, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and WWF have committed resources to put in place a Focal Point for the PEP Working Group on ES/PES for a one year trial period (1 September 2007 through 31 August 2008). The Focal Point is located at and staffed by WWF’s MPO PES program in Washington DC. Responsible persons there are Pablo Gutman and Sarah Davidson. The Focal Point also has modest resources to support travel expenses, publication and communication, and meetings’ costs.

If you are interested in the activities of the PEP Working Group on ES/PES we ask you to send your ideas regarding ES/PES issues to address at future PEP meetings, send us your ideas for possible PEP ES/PES side activities at international gatherings.Keep the Focal Point in mind and use it as a resource to help you identify references, partners, and audiences for your ES/PES interests and activities.

For more information please contact

Pablo Gutman and Sarah Davidson; WWF-Macroeconomics for Sustainable Development Program Office (WWF-MPO) (Pablo.gutman@wwfus.org and Sarah.davidson@wwfus.org)
and
François Droz, Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation Environment Division (francois.droz@deza.admin.ch)

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UPCOMING EVENTS

4TH – 6TH FEBRUARY 2008
CAPACITY BUILDING WORKSHOP ON PAYMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES (PES) IN EASTERN AFRICA; - DAR ES SALAAM

Objectives of the workshop;-

  • Build capacity for using PES as an incentive for Sustainable Land Management:
  • Provide an introduction to what PES are and how they could work- aimed at land and water agricultural managers/planners/decision makers that aren’t yet familiar with
  • the mechanism
  • Offer an overview of PES scenario in the world, focusing on East Africa and highlighting obstacles faced and successful approaches
  • Generate discussion on the legislation and institutional framework required for PES development in East Africa
  • Highlight the necessary conditions to facilitate the participation of poorer rural groups in PES schemes
  • Create in country and regional partnerships among policy makers and Natural Resource managers to facilitate the development of PES related schemes and required institutional
  • mechanisms;
  • Get feedback on need for tools/guidelines/analyses from the field to support ongoing PES development (also link with the Kagera community catchments river basin and related project
  • activities)

Target audience includes technical staff from a range of sectors: water, livestock and cropping systems, rangeland management, agro forestry, wetland conservation; Civil Society and NGOs: Buyers of Environmental Services: River Basin Authorities, Ministries, private sector; Research institutions/networks; donors and Foundations

For more information about the workshop please contact Bernadette.Neves@fao.org ______________________________

25TH - 28TH FEBRUARY 2008.
2ND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HEALTH AND BIODIVERSITY, GALWAY, IRELAND 2008

The Second International Conference on Health and Biodiversity will be held in Galway, Ireland. Conference sessions will explore how health aspects of the U.N. Millennium Development Goals are influenced by the status of global biodiversity, and will review the impacts and implications of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. The conference will also look at the outputs of other relevant programmes and mechanisms, including the recent reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and outputs of other related conferences and initiatives. The over-riding focus will be on experience sharing, with the aim of encouraging greater cross-sector and inter-disciplinary co-operation on issues at the interface of the health and ecological sciences.

For full details of the conference, please visit the conference website at: Www.cohabnet.org/cohab2008, or contact the conference organising committee at: conference@cohabnet.org______________________________

MAY 19-30, 2008
NINTH MEETING OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES TO THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY (COP 9), 19-30 MAY 2008, BONN, GERMANY

For details and the full text of this notification see http://www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2007/ntf-2007-150-cop-en.pdf______________________________

JUNE 2-6, 2008
SULLIVAN SUMMIT VIII, ARUSHA, TANZANIA

The Leo Sullivan Summit VIII, convened through plenary sessions and forums, is an opportunity to among others, advocate for the sustainability of the environment as an integral part of Africa’s long-term economic success. The summit will:-

    • Bring together African and American entrepreneurs and investors in the infrastructure, tourism and environment sectors to meet the development needs of Tanzania and Africa
    • Engage the African Union, COMESA, ECOWAS, SADC, EAC and other regional blocs in discussion on regional integration strategies
    • Reach out to Asia as a source of strategic partnerships and investment generating opportunities
    • Ensure that investors, NGOs and governments, are practicing in accordance with the standards of social accountability put forth in the Global Sullivan Principles creating facilitative conditions for the growth of the private sector

For more details visit http://www.leonsullivanfoundation.org; http://www.thesullivansummit.go.tz/ or email e. kcohen@thesullivanfoundation.org

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RESOURCES AND TOOLS

NEW STANDARD FOR FORESTRY CREDITS

CarbonFix, a non-profit German foundation, has produced a standard for the voluntary carbon markets designed specifically to certify afforestation and reforestation projects generating carbon credits. CarbonFix says the standard will fill a void in the voluntary market by providing an accreditation service that accounts for issues such as tree permanence and accurate calculation of credits.
For more information on the standard see http://www.carbonfix.info/______________________________

ENVIRONMENT ENCYCLOPEDIA & DIRECTORY 2007
.

This book examines environment issues throughout the world, providing an easy-to-use reference source covering a wide variety of environmental affairs that are brought together conveniently into one volume. It contains a systematic A-Z section of key terms including deforestation, greenhouse effect, accelerated erosion, energy, balance, landfill, a comprehensive directory section organised alphabetically by country listing 3000 government and non-governmental organisations both national and international, an extensive index lists environmental organisations according to their fields of activity, a series of maps which show areas of pollution, rainforest, and other environmental features both regionally and worldwide, an extensive bibliography of relevant periodicals and a comprehensive Who's Who section of leading personalities actively involved with environmental organisations.
For further information see http://www.routledge.com/shopping_cart/products/product_detail.asp?sku=&isbn=9781857433777&pc=

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NEW PUBLICATIONS

NEGOTIATING FOR NATURE’S SERVICES: A PRIMER FOR SELLERS OF ECOSYSTEM SERVICES ON IDENTIFYING & APPROACHING PROSPECTIVE PRIVATE SECTOR BUYERS
Forest Trends, The Ecosystem Marketplace and the Katoomba Group

This primer was written to help rural communities tap into these emerging markets for ecosystem services in order to fund local conservation and sustainable development. It is intended to be a reference tool for identifying, negotiating, and closing ecosystem service deals with private sector buyers. In issuing this primer, Forest Trends hopes to increase the number of conversations between potential sellers and prospective private sector buyers of ecosystem services.

To download the primer visit http://147.202.71.177/~katoomba/documents/publications/NegotiatingforNature.pdf ______________________________

PAYING FARMERS TO PROTECT THE PLANET –THE STATE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
The United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)

"Farming has the potential to degrade the Earth's land, water, atmosphere and biological resources -- or to enhance them -- depending on the decisions made by the more than 2 billion people whose livelihoods depend directly on crops, livestock, fisheries or forests….Ensuring appropriate incentives for these people is essential," said FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf. in his foreword to the agency's annual report "The State of Food and Agriculture" which focused on environmental payments.

Environmental payments to farmers do not have to be linked to them stopping farming, but can be an incentive to make it less damaging, such as encouraging "shade-grown" coffee rather than intensive production where forest canopies are destroyed.

The report stresses the drawbacks as well as potential benefits of environmental payment schemes, for example the risk that they may reduce food output for hungry populations.

"The impact of a PES (payment for environmental services) approach on the poor is highly dependent on who holds the rights to use resources," the report says -- noting the risk that such schemes might benefit relatively wealthy landowners more often than the extremely poor who own nothing.

To download the report visit ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/a1200e/a1200e00.pdf

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