April 2008

FROM THE EDITOR
Dear Katoomba Members,

Welcome to the April 2008 edition of the East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group e-newsletter.  

Our newsletter aims to keep our readers aware of the latest news and events relating to markets and payments for ecosystem services (PES) in the East and Southern Africa region and around the world.

We welcome your feedback, comments and suggestions, including any articles that you may wish to share with our readers.Please send them by e-mail to aruhweza@forest-trends.org

Yours sincerely

Alice Ruhweza
Coordinator, East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. ESA KATOOMBA NEWS

2. NEW PES-RELATED INFORMATION FROM VARIOUS COUNTRIES IN THE REGION

3. NEWS FROM ACROSS THE OCEAN

4. OTHER RELATED NEWS

5. UPCOMING EVENTS

6.  NEW PUBLICATIONS, RESOURCES & TOOLS

ESA KATOOMBA NEWS

EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA PES ASSESSMENT UNDERWAY

The East and Southern African Katoomba Group is embarking on an assessment of: a) existing payment for ecosystem service (PES) deals that could be expanded or replicated in other sites, and
(b) Promising potential sites for broadening and deepening either: engagement in environmental markets (most notably international carbon markets) and/or application of the payments for ecosystem services (PES) in the region. 

The goal of this assessment is to improve the understanding of the development and potential for PES initiatives in select countries within the East and Southern Africa region and to explore “proof of concept” related to PES applications within the region.

The assessment builds on the 2005 and 2006 country inventories of PES and PES type projects that were carried out by Katoomba Group members in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, South Africa and Madagascar. A new inventory will be done in Malawi.

The assessments are one component of a longer process that aims to chart a course for expanding the number and reach of PES deals and engagements with environmental markets across the East and Southern Africa region. The end goal is to contribute both to conservation and rural economic development, including poverty alleviation objectives.

Results of the PES Review will be presented at the Regional Katoomba meeting to be held in Tanzania on September 17th – 20th, 2008.

For more information about the review and the meeting, contact Alice Ruhweza; aruhweza@forest-trends.org

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EAST AND SOUTHERN AFRICA KATOOMBA GROUP REGIONAL MEETING TO TAKE PLACE IN TANZANIA

The 2008 East and Southern Africa Katoomba Group meeting will take place in Tanzania from September 17th - 20th, in collaboration with the CARE, WWF and the Natural Capital Project. The meeting will bring together all the full range of actors interested in markets and payments for ecosystem services (PES), including potential buyers, sellers, and intermediaries from throughout the East and Southern Africa region.  The event will enable an exchange of market information as well as ongoing learning about diverse PES policy and project models, and making of PES deals.

The meeting will open with a "PES Trade Fair" - the first of its kind in East Africa. Sellers from the region will exhibit the ecosystem services on sale from their sites, and potential buyers will be invited to meet with the sellers and negotiate potential PES deals.

The next day will be a public meeting which will offer an introduction to key existing markets and payments for ecosystem services as well as specific PES efforts underway in Tanzania.  The third and fourth day will focus on addressing specific challenges associated with designing and implementing PES deals as well as capacity building.  Potential themes for capacity-building--drawn from the regional PES needs assessment conducted to date—include:

  • Identification of promising opportunities and conditions for PES, such as the ecosystem assessment tool being piloted in the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania by the Valuing the Arc Project
  • Design and implementation of policy and institutional frameworks (e.g. designation of rights to buy and sell ecosystem stewardship services, design of registries to track services),
  • Pro-poor planning and design of projects and policies,
  • Mobilization and aggregation of private sector and other buyers,
  • Valuation and pricing of goods, and/or
  • Design features to achieve biodiversity impacts at landscape scale.
Final selection of topics and invitees will be done by the Katoomba members in the region as a part of the agenda-setting process for regular Katoomba Group meetings.

Resource people will be available from the regional and international Katoomba Group networks, the Natural Capital Project, CARE, WWF and many more.

Participants will also have the opportunity to visit a site of a PES project. 
To find out more about the meeting, please contact: aruhweza@forest-trends.org

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NEW PES-RELATED INFORMATION FROM COUNTRIES IN THE REGION

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION TO BRING 1 MILLION SOUTH AFRICAN CERS TO MARKET
Source: Reuters; March 17th, 2008  

On March 17, 2008, the International Finance Corporation, the World Bank's private-sector lender, signed its first carbon delivery guarantee agreements with fertilizer producers Omnia of South Africa. IFC will sell 1 million UN-regulated carbon credits on behalf of Omnia Holdings - a fertiliser and chemical company. A UN-registered project at Omnia’s Sasolburg fertliser plant is expected to generate 420,000 certified emissions reductions (CERs) annually over the 2008-2012 period under the Kyoto protocol’s clean development mechanism (CDM). The IFC has been tasked with selling 200,000 CERs per year from this project to corporate or governmental buyers, Omnia’s Trevor Grant told Point Carbon.

“We are riding on the strength of their balance sheet and hope that can get us a better price,” Grant explained. IFC’s AAA-rating means it can guarantee the delivery of the CERs with less risk involved for any counter party.

Grant said Omnia is in the closing stages of negotiations with another international bank to market the remaining 220,000 CERs it expects to generate on an annual basis.

Lance Crist, head of IFC's oil, gas and chemicals division, said other companies in Egypt, Tanzania, China, India, Mexico and Brazil had expressed interest in the product. Under the guarantee, IFC will help facilitate the delivery of carbon credits from companies in developing countries to buyers in developed markets, such as Europe and Japan.

Under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol, companies in developing countries can qualify to sell carbon credits, known as Certified Emission Reductions, in global commodity markets when they reduce their output of environmentally harmful substances. However, so-called compliance buyers, the large utility companies in Europe or Japan, which are obliged to reduce their emissions under Kyoto, have been averse to paying full price for credits from developing nations because of the risk associated with doing business in these countries. The IFC product guaranteed companies' ability to deliver the carbon credit.

"This is not yet a very efficient and completely transparent market, so sellers of the credits don't know exactly what the prices are that they're getting and they don't know if those funds are going to be around tomorrow," he said. "So, IFC is offering a product that basically gives full transparency to carbon credit sellers by showing them what the prices are and guaranteeing their delivery to the buyers and in return we take a small spread to compensate us for that credit enhancement," Crist added.

The guarantee gives companies in the developing world an incentive to participate in the growing global credit market and improve their profitability.

"Each of these companies has to invest several million dollars to implement their emissions reduction projects. But in return, they have the prospect of generating significant inflows from the carbon credits," Crist added.

"Participation so far from the developing world through the CDM has been limited," he said. "We believe there is immense potential for companies in the developing world to participate, which will have the benefit of both addressing climate change, which is fundamentally our concern, but also creating demonstration models to encourage other companies in the developing world to participate."

For more information see http://uk.reuters.com/article/oilRpt/idUKN1741531520080317

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ESTABLISHING WILDLIFE CONSERVANCIES TO SAFEGUARD THE FUTURE OF THE MASAI MARA

Beyond the Masai Mara National Reserve is a vast area of Maasai community land which forms an important part of the Mara ecosystem and is a vital dispersal area for all of the wildlife species for which the Mara is famous. In recent years, this area has been subdivided into thousands of small parcels of land which have been allocated now to individual Maasai landowners. As a result, maize cultivation and large scale wheat farms have sprung up in the outer Mara area resulting into loss of wildlife habitat and big decreases in wildlife population. If this trend continues, the wildlife dispersal areas to the north of the Masai Mara National Reserve which are a critical component of the Mara ecosystem will shrink, as will the buffer zone between wilderness and cultivated lands.

Jake Grieves Cook, Chairman of Kenya Tourist Board, is championing the idea of establishing wildlife conservancies formed by the Maasai land owners putting their individual plots together to form an area to be set aside for wildlife. Two conservancies have been formed as a model for the way forward – the Olkinyei and the Olare Orok Conservancy. It is hoped that as a result, neighbouring communities will also set up similar conservancies so that a substantial wildlife dispersal area is created.

A further threat to wildlife is the big increase in many tourist facilities springing up along the perimeter of the Park, resulting in too many tourist vehicles. The conservancy concept offers a solution to this problem as well, because it limits the number of camps that can be established in the area and there are strict limits to the number of tourist beds allowed, with a maximum of 1 tent per 700 acres.

By doing this, the communities are providing an ecosystem service, and Mr. Cook believes that the conservancy concept offers landowners better income per acre than from alternative land use as it provides employment for their families, and some share of the income from tourism. He says, “.Since the two conservancies were set up, we have seen a regeneration of vegetation and a big increase in wildlife numbers including lions and cheetahs moving in”.

What remains to be seen, however, is whether this compensation is attractive enough for landowners to give up agriculture.

Source: Part of this story was taken from Msafiri Magazine; Edition 62; Feb-April 2008; for more information visit www.masaimara.com

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FIRST AFRICAN WATER WEEK STRESSES THE NEED TO ADDRESS WATER SECURITY THROUGH MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE

During the First African Water Week held in Tunis from March 26-28, 2008, the African Development Bank (AfDB) president, Donald Kaberuka, called for more efforts to be made to ensure that water security is a reality on the continent at the national and regional level.  Although Africa contributes very little to climate change, experts hold that the continent will be hit the hardest by climate change, especially in terms of increased water stress, Mr. Kaberuka said, adding that adaptation to climate change constituted a development priority. In recognition of this, the AfDB is developing a climate risk management and adaptation strategy to guide its efforts on the continent.

 The Bank Group’s overall financing in water supply and sanitation has increased five-fold, from an average of less than US$ 70 million per annum by 2002, to over US$ 330 million per annum since 2003.

 The main objective of the First African Water Week (AWW-1) is to create a forum for African water sector professionals, stakeholders and partners to discuss opportunities and challenges of achieving water security for the continent’s socio-economic development; and formulate concrete policies, strategies and actions to accelerate water resources development and provision of services taking into consideration challenges and impacts of climate change and variability.

For more information visit http://appablog.wordpress.com/2008/03/26/afdb-president-pledges-to-place-water-at-the-centre-of- africa%E2%80%99s-socio-economic-development/

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OTHER RELATED NEWS

MILLION ACRES OF GUYANESE RAINFOREST TO BE SAVED IN GROUNDBREAKING DEAL
Source: The Independent Newspaper; 28 March 2008

A deal has been agreed that will place a financial value on rainforests – paying, for the first time, for their upkeep as "utilities" that provide vital services such as rainfall generation, carbon storage and climate regulation.

The agreement, announced on March 28th in New York, will secure the future of one million acres of pristine rainforest in Guyana, the first move of its kind, and will open the way for financial markets to play a key role in safeguarding the fate of the world's forests. The initiative follows Guyana's extraordinary offer to place its entire standing forest under the protection of a British-led international body in return for development aid.

Hylton Murray-Philipson, director of the London-based financiers Canopy Capital, who sealed the deal with the Iwokrama rainforest, said: "How can it be that Google's services are worth billions but those from the entire world's rainforests amount to nothing?"

Guyana, sandwiched between the Latin American giants Venezuela and Brazil, is home to fewer than a million people but 80 per cent of its land is covered by an intact rainforest larger than England. The Guiana Shield is one of only four intact rainforests left on the planet and at its heart lies the Iwokrama reserve, gifted to the Commonwealth in 1989 as a laboratory for pioneering conservation projects.
Iwokrama, which means "place of refuge" in the Makushi language, is home to some of the world's most endangered species including jaguar, giant river otter, anaconda and giant anteater.

Guyana's President Bharrat Jagdeo, a former economist, has appealed for state and private sector help for the country to avoid succumbing to the rampant deforestation currently blighting Brazil and Indonesia, in an effort to raise living standards in one of Latin America's poorest countries. The deal, drawn up by the international firm Stephenson Harwood, is the first serious attempt to pay for the ecosystem services provided by rainforests.

In addition to providing shelter to half the world's terrestrial species and one billion of the earth's poorest people, forests such as Iwokrama act as pumps, drawing water from the Atlantic Ocean inland to the Amazon and Guiana Shield where they help to seed clouds and deliver moisture over vast distances. The Amazon generates the rain that falls on the vast soya estates of Sao Paulo, helping to make Brazil the second biggest agricultural exporter in the world.

Guyana's attempt to secure its entire standing forest has received the backing of the British environment minister Phil Woolas and Downing Street has told The Independent that it is "considering the offer". President Jagdeo met with Gordon Brown on the sidelines of a recent Commonwealth Summit in Uganda where they discussed the proposal. The UN road map to a deal to replace the Kyoto protocols foresees payments from wealthy climate-polluting nations to developing countries to compensate for potential income lost through avoiding deforestation. But there are fears that this formula may simply displace the demand for timber and cheap agricultural land.

Source: The Independent Newspaper; www.independent.co.uk

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OTHER RELATED NEWS

CANADIAN UTILITY COMPANY EPCOR TO BUY 2 MILLION CARBON OFFSETS FROM FARMERS WHO CONSERVE CARBON IN SOIL
Source: Point Carbon; 20.03.08  

Alberta-based Canadian utility EPCOR announced plans to buy up to 2 million greenhouse gas emission reduction credits from farmers who conserve carbon in soil through sustainable agricultural practices.  The first payments are being made to farmers who are enrolled in a programme developed by EPCOR and Carbon Reduction Offset Projects (CROP).

EPCOR is subject to carbon emissions intensity regulations under the Alberta government’s climate plan, which requires the province’s 100 largest emitters to cut greenhouse gases per unit of production by 12 per cent from a 2003-2006 baseline. Companies can meet these targets by offsetting their emissions with carbon credits from projects in agriculture and other sectors. Farmers enrolled in the CROP programme can qualify to sell such credits by avoiding soil tillage and having their conservation practices verified by a third party. The third party checks that they have employed the proposed conservation techniques.

The programme with CROP has been in the works for three years, but that farmers are now receiving payment for the credits from EPCOR. Robert Janzen of the verifier Climate Check told Point Carbon that soil conservation practices sequester about 0.1 to 0.25 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent per acre per year. Other offset categories allowed under Alberta’s greenhouse gas reduction include energy efficiency measures, afforestation, and energy from biomass combustion.

For more information see http://www.pointcarbon.com/Home/News/All%20news/Kyoto%20International/Domestic%20ETS/article27345-882.html

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EU LAUNCHES €80 MILLION FUND TO BOOST ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLES FOR POOR NATIONS
Source: Point Carbon; March 28th, 2008
 
On March 28th, 2008, the European commission launched an €80 million ($126 million) fund aimed at spurring private investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects in developing countries and economies in transition. The commission over the next four years will contribute the money to the so-called Global Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fund (GEEREF), which is targeted at small-scale projects. “It is hoped that this fund will mobilise private sector finance especially in small scale projects to accelerate the transfer, development and deployment of environmentally sound technologies, and thereby help to bring secure and clean energy supplies to people in the poorest regions of the world,” the commission said in a statement.

Some 1.6 billion people in the world’s poorest countries lack regular access to reliable energy services. At the same time, energy efficiency and renewable energy project developers face difficulties in getting access to commercial funding, the commission pointed out. The GEEREF fund will give priority to “deploying environmentally sound technologies with a proven technical track record” by investing in regional sub-funds in Africa, the Caribbean, non-EU Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Asian Pacific region.

In addition to the commission’s pledge of €80 million, total initial funding from public and commercial sources is expected to reach up to €200 million. Further capital could grow to at least €300 million and possibly up to €1 billion in the longer term, the commission said.

For more information see https://pointcarbon.com/Home/News/All%20news/Kyoto%20International/article27450- 472.html?articleID=27450&categoryID=472&noredirect=1

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NYMEX CARBON EXCHANGE SEES FIRST TRADE IN CERs
Source; Point Carbon; March 17th, 2008  

On March 17th, 2008, Swiss-based trader Vitol and US investment firm RNK Capital executed the first carbon credit trade on the Green Exchange, an electronic trading platform for carbon credits established by the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX). The trade was for 25,000 certified emission reductions, UN offset credits, for delivery in December 2008, and was brokered by Evolution Markets, the companies announced in a press release today.

The trade marks the first day of business for the exchange, which also plans to offer other environmental products, such as EU allowances, voluntary credits and carbon credits from regional US-based trading schemes, such as the northeastern US scheme the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.

For more see http://www.pointcarbon.com/Home/News/All%20news/CDM%20&%20JI/article27273-470.html

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JP MORGAN BUYS CARBON OFFSET FIRM CLIMATECARE
Source: Environmental Finance News; 27 March, 2008

US investment bank JPMorgan has bought ClimateCare, one of the oldest carbon offset providers, to strengthen its carbon credit origination business. The two parties did not disclose the value of the transaction, but it will see UK-based ClimateCare’s 40 staff around the world joining JPMorgan’s 11-strong environmental markets team. The US bank will assume ClimateCare’s portfolio of projects, origination capacity and existing book of business. As part of the acquisition, ClimateCare’s project sourcing arm, Pioneer Carbon, will become part of the newly combined business. The group will initially operate under both the JPMorgan and ClimateCare brand names.

ClimateCare, based in UK; with field offices in Kenya, Turkey, Chile and Mauritius, specialises in supplying carbon offsets to the voluntary market. It has a particular focus on higher-quality projects with a social component in addition to their emissions reduction potential.

However, it has been moving into the mandatory markets, developing projects that qualify under the Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). According a ClimateCare spokesman, the company has a pipeline of some 8 to 10 million tonnes of carbon dioxide or equivalent, all accredited “to leading standards”, such as the Gold Standard, the Voluntary Carbon Standard and the CDM.

For more on this story see http://www.environmental-finance.com/onlinews/0327jpm.html

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UPCOMING EVENTS

22 APRIL, 2008
CO2 INTRODUCTORY TRAINING COURSE, LONDON

The training course is designed for traders, analysts, risk managers or executives who need a
thorough understanding of how carbon markets work. Through this course, participants will gain insights into policy, legislation and market dynamics as well as price analysis, and supply and demand drivers. For a more detailed agenda and online registration: see http://www.pointcarbon.com/Events/Training%20courses/CO2%20Geneva/category1437.html_______________________________________

24TH APRIL 2008
FOREST DAY: SHAPING THE DEBATE ON FORESTS AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN CENTRAL AFRICA
 PALAIS DE CONGRÈS, YAOUNDÉ, CAMEROON.

 The Central African Congo Basin, the second largest forest area in the world, will play a crucial role in the success of any climate change policy. Proposed new climate initiatives raise questions about the impact and role of these initiatives in the region.   CIFOR is organizing Forest Day – to help shape the debate on forests and climate change in Central Africa. .
 
Speakers representing a broad range of forest stakeholders will present and discuss prominent forest issues central to the climate change debate. There will be scientists, local and international NGOs, university lecturers, policymakers, communities, experts and others interested in the subject.
 
Presentations, discussions and debates will focus on:
 
- Forest’s role in climate change mitigation
- REDD and mitigating climate change in Central Africa
- REDD, markets and governance
- Forests and climate change in Central Africa
- Financing mechanisms
- Estimating carbon stock
- Pilot projects and their technical, monitoring and data-related challenges
- The carbon market and the forestry sector
- REDD and rural poverty
- Interactions between REDD and other forest management approaches
 
For more information about the event, contact Janneke Romijn by email at ForestDay-Cameroon@cgiar.org  or telephone (237) 2222 74 49 / (237) 2222 74 51. Fax: (237) 2222 74 50.
 http://www.cifor.cgiar.org/Regions/CAfrica/Events/FDCentralAfrica/cameroon_program.htm
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2ND MAY, 2008
UNEP FI WEST AFRICA ROUNDTABLE - Sustainable Finance: Opportunities and Challenges
 LAGOS, NIGERIA

Organised by UNEP FI's African Task Force (ATF), this West African Roundtable on "Sustainable Finance: Opportunities and Challenges" is kindly supported by Citigroup and will welcome over 50 financial sector, government and NGO delegates from the region. Roundtable discussions will focus on concepts of sustainable finance and enable delegates to deepen their understanding of actions the finance sector can take.

The results of a UNEP FI study on the barriers and drivers to commercial microfinance in Africa will be released, along with reports and case studies on innovative financing and risk mitigation mechanisms for sustainable small and medium enterprises (SMEs). It is hoped discussions will provide a fruitful platform for financial institutions in West Africa so they can embrace their role in sustainable development.

For further information, please visit: http://www.unepfi.org/regional_activities/africa/index.html_______________________________________

MAY 19-30, 2008
NINTH MEETING OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES TO THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY (COP 9), 19-30 MAY 2008, BONN, GERMANY
Several side events looking at PES will take place at the COP. For details and the full text of this notification see http://www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2007/ntf-2007-150-cop-en.pdf_______________________________________

7-11 AUGUST 2008
INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS BIENNIAL 2008; NAIROBI, KENYA,

The ISEE is pleased to announce that its 10th Biennial Conference has been scheduled for August 7-11, 2008 in Nairobi Kenya. The conference, "ISEE2008 NAIROBI: APPLYING ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS FOR SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY" is a joint undertaking by the International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE), African Society for Ecological Economics (ASEE) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The conference will highlight the vision, methods and policy adjustments needed to enable ecological economics principles to be applied to the design and management of environmentally and socially sustainable development processes in the face of increasing global change and interdependence.

CONFERENCE THEMES

I. ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS AND SERVICES II. CLIMATE CHANGE III. ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS FOR DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES


1.1- Equity and valuation issues in payment for ecosystem services
1.2- Biophysical dimensions (e.g., biodiversity, nitrogen cycle)
1.3- Qualitative dimensions of ecosystem services valuation
1.4- Bridging micro and macro perspectives
1.5- Markets for ecosystem services: theoretical and implementation dimensions

2.1- Climate mitigation strategies
2.2- Adaptation to climate change
2.3- Compensation for reduced deforestation
3.1- Macroeconomic issues and the environment
3.2- Sustainable trade regimes
3.3- Ecological economics challenges and policies for Africa

The venue for the Nairobi event is the UNEP conference facilities. Principal organizers of the conference are Peter May, ISEE President-Elect, Kevin Urama, President, ASEE and Anantha Duraiappah, Chief, Ecosystems and Economics Unit, UNEP.

 Expanded abstracts must be submitted by March 31, 2008 through the conference website. http://www.ecoeco.org/conferences.php_______________________________________

5 to 14 OCTOBER 2008;
THE IUCN WORLD CONSERVATION CONGRESS; BARCELONA, SPAIN

 More than 8,000 leaders from government, the public sector, non-governmental organizations, business, UN agencies and social organizations will discuss debate and decide solutions for the world’s most pressing environment and development issues. The Congress starts with the four-day Forum run by IUCN members and partners discussing cutting edge ideas, thinking and practice. The Forum leads into the four-day IUCN Members’ Assembly, a unique global environmental parliament of governments and NGOs. For more visit
http://cms.iucn.org/news/events/congress/congress_about/index.cfm _______________________________________

WALKING FOR CONSERVATION, 2008

Project African Wilderness (PAW), a conservation charity based in Malawi and the UK, is inviting anyone with a passion for conservation and sense of adventure to take part in a challenging once-in-a-lifetime trek in Malawi in October 2008. PAW is working to save Mwabvi Wildlife Reserve in Southern Malawi, a unique piece of Africa’s natural wilderness. The walk will cover 15km a day for five days during one of the hottest times of the year. For more information visit www.projectafricanwilderness.org or Email: Gaynor@projectafricanwilderness.org

RESOURCES AND TOOLS

NEW PES WEBSITE - GLOBAL CONSERVATION PAYMENT INITIATIVES

This website recently launched by Paul Ferarro at Georgia State University, provides basic information about the types of ecosystem conservation payment initiatives taking place around the world. 

Available online at http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwcec/special/ci/index.html   _______________________________________

ADAPTING TO CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CHANGE: GUIDANCE MANUAL FOR DEVELOPMENT PLANNING. Produced by: USAID Global Climate Change Program (2007)

It is important to consider the potential impact of climate change when planning and designing development projects. Understanding, planning for and adapting to changing climate enables individuals and societies to make the most of opportunities and reduce risk.

This guidance manual looks at how to understand climate change as it may impact on project cycles and incorporating a six-step approach for assessing vulnerability and implementing adaptation.
The manual also gives various concrete examples of USAID projects applying this in many different countries as well as helpful learning tools such as explanatory flow-charts, further resources and links.

Available online at: http://www.eldis.org/cf/rdr/?doc=35292_______________________________________

CDM COUNTRY FACT SHEETS. Produced by: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (2008)

These fact sheets provide information about Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project developments in six Asian countries: Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines and Thailand. The sheets include information on domestic Green House Gas (GHG) emission data, domestic approval related information, and the current situation of domestic CDM project development.

Available online at: http://www.eldis.org/cf/rdr/?doc=35660_______________________________________

NEW GUIDE URGES BUSINESSES TO ADDRESS ECOSYSTEM CHANGES

Ecosystem degradation, caused by global warming or direct human action, has the potential to severely disrupt businesses or provide beneficial opportunities, according to a new report.

"The Corporate Ecosystem Services Review: Guidelines for Identifying Business Risks and Opportunities Arising from Ecosystem Change", add URL provides a series of guidelines to help businesses figure out how they interact with ecosystems and what their options are. The World Resources Institute, Meridian Institute and World Business Council for Sustainable Development worked together on the guidelines and enlisted five businesses to try them out, supplying case studies from them throughout the report.

The guidelines look at how businesses could be hurt by or benefit from their own actions as well as what others do. A business that relies on natural resources, such as a lumber company, should take action to avoid stripping the earth of the resource it relies on. In the case of forestry, companies can adopt sustainable harvesting methods and preserve certain habitats, among other options. Businesses that create or sell paper-based products can seek out certified sustainable wood for their products, potentially drawing customers from companies that use virgin wood.

The Corporate Ecosystem Services Review also warns that as more ecosystems change, more government regulation, fines or fees could come into play, and it would be in a company's best interest to work with governments on preserving ecosystems.

Each business related to a certain ecosystem could have different levels of dependence on it, and the guidelines are designed to show a business how to figure out where its priorities lie, look at and analyze trends, figure out their risks and opportunities, lay out strategies and take action.

For more information visit http://www.wbcsd.org/plugins/DocSearch/details.asp?type=DocDet&ObjectId=Mjg5NzA_______________________________________

CONSERVING BIODIVERSITY IS A BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY, SAY IUCN AND SHELL

The business case for conserving nature is strong and getting stronger, according to a new report Building Biodiversity Business published recently by IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) and Shell International Limited.

As the world wakes up to the accelerating loss of biological diversity, businesses are increasingly viewing biodiversity conservation as a potential profit centre, says the report.

The report calls for policy reforms to increase the commercial rewards for conserving biodiversity, increased penalties for biodiversity loss and better information on the biodiversity performance of business. A key challenge facing all biodiversity businesses is the lack of accepted indicators to measure positive and negative contributions to biodiversity conservation.

"There are numerous pro-biodiversity business opportunities that can generate significant profits as well as benefits for nature," says Dr Joshua Bishop, IUCN's Senior Advisor on Economics and the Environment. "But a few inspiring examples aren't enough. This report shows how to achieve a major increase in business investment in biodiversity conservation, by linking policy reforms, technical assistance and innovative financing tools."

Ecotourism is one example of how money can be made from looking after species and their habitats. Environmentally-friendly tourism is expanding at a rate of 20-30 percent annually, compared with 9 percent for tourism as a whole. Many other businesses, historically responsible for the loss of biodiversity, are starting to lead the way by protecting biodiversity. Markets for organic agriculture and sustainably-harvested timber are growing at double-digit rates. Another major area of growth is the demand for climate mitigation services, such as the protection of forests and wetlands to absorb carbon dioxide.

Bio-prospecting, the search for new compounds, genes and organisms in the wild, is also a biodiversity business on the rise. Some suggest the sector could be worth as much as US$500 million by 2050.

"For businesses to conserve biodiversity it must ultimately become more profitable to protect nature and use natural resources sustainably, rather than ignore or destroy it," says Sachin Kapila, Group Biodiversity Adviser at Shell International Limited.

For more information and to download the report visit http://www.insnet.org/ins_headlines.rxml?id=8550&photo=_______________________________________

NEW EUROPEAN COMMISSION WEBSITE ASSESSING PROTECTED AREAS IN AFRICA.

This website is part of a first attempt at a large scale assessment of protected areas using objective continent-wide data sets and methodologies as opposed to case studies on individual parks or global assessments. The website contains information on 741 protected areas, across 50 countries, and includes information on 280 mammals, 381 bird species and 930 amphibian species, and a wide range of climatic, environmental and socioeconomic information. The purpose of the work is to provide to decision makers a regularly updated tool to assess the state of Africa PAs and to prioritize them according to biodiversity values and threats so as to support decision making and fund allocation processes. The website can be viewed at http://www-tem.jrc.it/pa/

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NEW PUBLICATIONS

MAKING SENSE OF THE VOLUNTARY CARBON MARKET: A COMPARISON OF CARBON OFFSET STANDARDS
Authors: Kollmuss, A.; Zinc, H.; Polycarp, C.
Produced by: Stockholm Environment Institute (2008)

The report compares the standards side-by-side and outlines the most pertinent aspects of each. It also includes a one page reference table for a quick comparison of the standards. The evaluated standards are:

  • Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
  • Gold Standard (GS)
  • Voluntary Carbon Standard 2007 (VCS 2007)
  • VER+
  • Voluntary Offset Standard (VOS)
  • Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX)
  • Climate, Community & Biodiversity Standards (CCBS)
  • Plan Vivo System
  • ISO 14064-2
  • GHG Protocol for Project Accounting

Available online at: http://www.eldis.org/cf/rdr/?doc=35935

____________________________

THE IMPLICATIONS OF CARBON FINANCING FOR PRO-POOR COMMUNITY FORESTRY
Authors: Luttrell,C. ; Schreckenberg,K. ; Pe,L.
Produced by: Overseas Development Institute, London (2008)

This paper explores the implications of new financing mechanisms, carbon markets and increased investment in forestry for community forestry. The main focus of the discussion is on 'Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation' (REDD).

The authors discuss the debate over who has the right to 'own' carbon, and how this controls the levels at which decisions are made. They highlight the fact that, although it is not yet clear at what level REDD will operate, it probably will involve a degree of centralised control. This has implications for pro-poor outcomes including; how carbon baselines and targets will be devolved to producers and the role played by governments. The document points out that the way in which benefits are targeted is a concern for the forest dependent poor.

Available online at: http://www.eldis.org/cf/rdr/?doc=35593____________________________

THE ROLE OF THE PRIVATE SECTOR IN RESPONSIBLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER RESOURCES.
Source: CSRwire); March 18, 2008

Business for Social Responsibility (BSR) has released a new study which explores the role of the private sector in responsible management of water resources Drinking It In: The Evolution of a Global Water Stewardship Program at The Coca-Cola Company chronicles the journey of The Coca-Cola Company over five years, and demonstrates how companies can be proactively involved in water management along their supply chains and within their own facilities

Drinking It In reviews the drivers for TCCC's commitment to water resources management, examines the complexities of integrating water initiatives throughout global systems, and outlines implications and key lessons to guide other companies that wish to gauge their water footprints and evaluate potential risks.

Available online at www.bsr.org/reports/Coke_Water_Study_March_2008.pdf.____________________________

“COMPENSATORY MITIGATION AS A SOLUTION TO FISHERIES BYCATCH–BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION CONFLICTS”
By: Chris Wilcox and C Josh Donlan (2007)
This article proposes a bio-economic approach which suggests that compensatory mitigation (or a biodiversity offset) can facilitate high-value uses of biological resources and cost-effective conservation gains for species of concern. Worldwide fishery bycatch has tremendous negative effects on many ocean dwelling species. Rather than focusing on pollution and bycatch, the authors propose offsetting the impacts of bycatch by investing in programs which would be revenue-neutral, or revenue-negative. For example, a bycatch levy, which would increase with endangerment, thus providing an incentive for avoiding bycatch, which is the most effective mechanism for sustainable management of fisheries.

Available online at http://www.forest-trends.org/biodiversityoffsetprogram/library/new/wilcox_&_donlan_2007.pdf____________________________

THE EQUITY AND LEGITIMACY OF MARKETS FOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES, Development and Change, Vol.38, No.4, pages 587-613, by Esteve Corbera, Katrina Brown and W. Neil Adger, 2007
Available online at http://dlc.dlib.indiana.edu/archive/00001362/00/Corbera_Equity_040527_Paper206.pdf____________________________

PAYMENTS FOR ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN MEXICO: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE OBJECTIVES
 Available online at http://www.ine.gob.mx/dgipea/  ____________________________

THE ROLE OF DEFORESTATION RISK AND CALIBRATED COMPENSATION IN DESIGNING PAYMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES
 Available online at www.ine.gob.mx/dgipea/descargas/mex_pes_poverty_janvry.pdf____________________________

PAYING FOR THE HYDROLOGICAL SERVICES OF MEXICO’S FORESTS: ANALYSIS, NEGOTIATIONS AND RESULTS,
Available online at www.ine.gob.mx/dgipea/descargas/draft_ecological_economics.pdf

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

AFRICAN FOREST RESEARCH NETWORK (AFORNET)
JUNIOR AND SENIOR SCIENTISTS FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMS
APPLICATION DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 30

The JSF program supports research in forest science and related areas. The grants are open to promising African scientists affiliated to training and research institutions in Africa who have shown the potential to undertake creative and innovative research in forestry in Africa, whether individually or as a team. Potential applicants include:

  • Active researchers in forestry science and related areas;
  • post-doctoral or graduate researchers, including post graduate students registered abroad, but intending to undertake field research in Africa; and
  • graduates intending to undertake research for a higher professional qualification. Applicants to the Junior Scientists’ Fellowship Program should not be over 40 years at the time of application.
  • AFORNET is also inviting African tree and forest scientists to submit multi-disciplinary and transnational research proposals that fall under one of the following thematic areas:
  • Woodland, Natural Forests and Biodiversity Conservation;
  • Community-Based Forestry;
  • Reforestation and Rehabilitation of Degraded and Arid Lands;
  • Socio-Economics and Policy Issues; and
  • Non-Timber Forest Products and Lesser Known Timber.

Grants are open to teams of senior scientists who are willing to undertake collaborative and transnational research in Africa. There is no age limit for the applicants to the Senior Scientists’ Fellowship Program. For more information on the two programs, visit AFORNET website at: http://www.afornet.org/grants.asp

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NEWSLETTERS

We invite you to look at the Katoomba Group’s other newsletters.

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